Fraud and Identity Theft Information

Fraud and Identity Theft Information

Every year many people fall victim to identity theft and impersonation which results in thousands of dollars being lost. The best way to protect yourself is to remain informed of the tactics that these people use to obtain your personal information or influence you to send them money or gift cards. Below is information from the Social Security Administration if you receive a call claiming there's a problem with your Social Security number or account:

If there is a problem, we will mail you a letter with your Social Security number. Generally, we will only contact you if you have requested a call or have ongoing business with us. The latest scam trick of using robocalls or live callers has increased. Fraudsters pretend to be government employees and claim there is identity theft or another problem with one's Social Security number, account, or benefits.

Scammers may threaten arrest or other legal action, or may offer to increase benefits, protect assets, or resolve identity theft. They often demand payment via retail gift cards, wire transfers, pre-paid debit cards, internet currency, or mailing cash.

Our employees will never threaten you for information or promise a benefit in exchange for personal information or money. Social Security may call you in some situations, but will never:

  • Threaten you.
  • Suspend your Social Security number.
  • Demand immediate payment from you.
  • Require payment by cash, gift card, pre-paid debit card, internet currency, or wire transfer.
  • Ask for gift card numbers over the phone or to wire or mail cash.

Don't be fooled! You should look out for:

  • A caller saying there is a problem with your Social Security number or account.
  • Any call asking you to pay a fine or debt with retail gift cards, wire transfers, pre-paid debit cards, internet currency, or by mailing cash.
  • Scammers pretending they're from Social Security or another government agency. Caller ID or documents sent by email may look official but they are not.

How to protect yourself and your family!

  • If you receive a questionable call, hang up, and report the call to our Office of the Inspector General.
  • Don't return unknown calls.
  • Ask someone you trust for advice before making any large purchase or financial decision.
  • Don't be embarrassed to report if you shared personal financial information or suffered a financial loss.
  • Learn more at oig.ssa.gov/scam.
  • Share this information with friends and family.

Learn more about fraud prevention and reporting at https://www.ssa.gov/antifraudfacts/.

Please make sure to pass this information to your friends and family, specifically older family members who area targeted by these actors. If you ever suspect you are a victim of fraud or identity theft contact your local police department immediately.